Schools in Long Whatton, 1818-51

Long Whatton is a village in north-west Leicestershire, 17 miles from Leicester and 5 miles from Loughborough.

Daily schools for poorer families in 1818 (population 782 in 1811)

Long Whatton had small schools for infants. The Anglican Sunday school also had weekday evening classes attached: the boys were taught writing and arithmetic on Monday evenings, and the girls on Tuesdays. There was nothing else for the poor, but the minister thought ‘the means are sufficient, as the parish consists of frame-workers, who cannot spare their children during the week.’

Daily schools in 1833 (population 855 in 1831)

Long Whatton appears to have no daily schools in 1833, only Sunday Schools.

Daily schools connected to the Anglican Church in 1846-7

Long Whatton had no Anglican daily school in 1847, only a Sunday School.

Sunday schools

In 1818

There was an Anglican Sunday school where 90 children were taught to read, free of charge, and a Baptist Sunday school with 50 children.

In 1833

There were still two Sunday Schools in 1835, with 120 scholars at the Anglican Sunday school and 84 at the Sunday school connected to the Baptist chapel.

Anglican Sunday school in 1846-7

There were 47 male and 32 female Sunday School students.

In 1851 (population 838)

On 30 March 1851, the General Baptist Chapel had around 103 Sunday School Students. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints had 10 Sunday Scholars in the morning, 33 in the afternoon and 31 in the evening. The Wesleyan Chapel had an average of 18 Sunday Scholars. There is no recorded Sunday School at the local Church of England.

Return to A History of Leicestershire Schools: A-Z

Sources

  • Education of the Poor Digest, Parl. Papers 1819 (224)
  • Education Enquiry, Parl. Papers 1835 (62)
  • National Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor in the Principles of the Established Church, Result of the Returns to the General Inquiry made by the National Society, into the state and progress of schools for the education of the poor … during the years 1846-7, throughout England and Wales ( London, 1849).
  • 1851 Ecclesiastical census